180 Nutrition -The Health Sessions.

180 Nutrition. We have another awesome guest for you in store today and her name is Yasmina Ykelenstam. She’s an ex-journalist with over 10 years research and international news production experience for people such as 60 Minutes, CNN and the BBC, so she knows how important it is to get her facts straight!

In 2008, after 20 years of being misdiagnosed with everything under the sun, she was forced to quit a career of a lifetime after seeing over 68 doctors. In 2010 she was finally diagnosed with histamine intolerance. Yasmina then embarks on a mission to get to the bottom of it all with the help of nutrition, lifestyle, meditation and a different approach to exercise... Prepare to be inspired!

In This Episode:

  • From journalist to health advocate; her story
  • What is histamine & the role it plays
  • How she dealt with her food allergies
  • The 'Natures Cosmetics' she uses for her skin 
  • Why meditation has played a big part in her recovery
  • And much much more...

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Transcript

Hi this is Guy Lawrence, I’m joined with Stewart Cook, hi Stu.

Stu:Hello Guy.

Guy:Our fantastic guest today is Yasmina Ykelenstam. Did I pronounce that correct?

Yasmina:Nearly Ykelenstam.

Guy:Ykelestam and I even practiced it before the show as well oh God, hopeless. Thank you so much for coming on the show today Yasmina. We’ve got some amazing topics to cover, but more importantly could you share your absolutely fascinating story with us as well and our listeners because it think it’s just fantastic.

Yasmina:I’ve been sick most of my life, on and off, with strange symptoms, allergy-like flues that weren’t flues, IBS, hives those kind of things. Then it really intensified when I was a journalist working in war zones in Iraq and Lebanon and eventually it got so bad that I had to quit my job and I had to find a career, a business that I could run from my bed basically which was I did some marketing and I used to pull on a shirt pretend I was shitting up in an office but really I’d be lying in my bed because I was so sick and nobody could tell me what it was.

Then finally I came across some woman in a … Not some woman, she’s a very good friend of mine, she’s also a blogger too and she told me it might be a histamine issue. I was in Bangkok at this point and I flew straight from Bangkok via New York, all the way to London and I got a diagnosis of something called histamine intolerance which I will get into in a minute and then it was I was then re-diagnosed with something called mast cell [00:04:00] activation. It’s not really clear, I seem to have both or maybe they are kind of the same thing but in any case it all worked out in the end and I’m feeling much better.

Guy:How long ago was that Yasmina?

Yasmina:The diagnosis?

Guy:Yeah.

Yasmina:The first was in 2010 and then the second diagnosis was in 2013.

Stu:There you go.

Stu:For everybody out there so for our listeners who are unfamiliar with histamine, now in my very limited knowledge I’m thinking it’s the kind of reactions that I used to get when I had high fever as a child, with stuffy, itchy, watery eyes and I just want to … Could you just touch on the role of histamine, what it is, what it does to the body?

Yasmina:That’s basically it. Histamine, we were used to hearing about anti-histamines, most people have histamine reactions. Histamine is an inflammatory molecules that lives in mast cells which are part of our white blood cell system. But it’s also found in foods. Histamine’s job is if there is some healing that needs to be done, the mast cells beak open and histamine and other inflammatory mediators go to the site of the infection and begin the healing process. But as I said, it’s also found in foods, but also, histamine’s role is diverse in the body. As I said, it’s an important player in the healing process, it’s a neurotransmitter which affects serotonin and dopamine, it plays a role in our metabolism in weight gain and weight loss, it’s part of the digestive process and it also helps set the circadian rhythm so our wakefulness cycle and it’s now been shown to be involved in narcolepsy.

Guy:Wow. What would the symptoms be of histamine intolerance? Everything? [00:06:00].

Yasmina:Pretty much which is why it takes an average, I’m going to use mast cell activation as an example here but it takes up to a decade or rather an average of a decade for the average woman to be diagnosed with mast cell activation which is related to histamine intolerance. A decade because the symptoms are so incredibly diverse and they rotate, and they migrate from different parts of the body as different clusters of mast cells become activated and depending on diet, which part of the world you live in.

In any case, here are some common symptoms, there are literally dozens of symptoms. I had 55 symptoms that were directly attributable to histamine intolerance or mast cell activation. Here are a couple of them otherwise we’ll be here all night. There’s IBS, acid reflux, food intolerance-like issues, migraines, hives, insomnia, blurry vision, palpitations, chronic fatigue, intolerances to extremes in temperature, and inability to fly in in planes because of the vibration and changes in pressure, food allergy-like symptoms and in the extreme, idiopathic anti-epileptic shock, idiopathic meaning we don’t know why.

Stu:Okay, well, given that very varied and almost crazy list of symptoms, how can we test for it?

 

Read full transcript here: http://180nutrition.com.au/?p=20446

 

 

Direct download: Low_Histamine_Chef_-_audio_FINISHED.m4a
Category:Health & Nutrition -- posted at: 7:03pm PST